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20091101
20091130
SHOW
STATION
WMPT (PBS) 9
WETA 6
LANGUAGE
English 15
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)
PBS
Nov 10, 2009 10:00pm EST
as the united states on health care per capita. how do they do that? one thing is for certain: japanese health care is a bargain. for just 8% of gdp-- that's less than even the british spend-- the japanese have built a system with fabulous health statistics. they have the longest healthy life expectancy in the world and the lowest infant mortality rate. now, part of that's due to diet and lifestyle, but the health system must be doing something right. everybody's covered, but unlike the brits, the japanese don't pay for all of it through taxes. instead, everybody has to sign up for a health insurance policy. you get it at work or through a community-based insurer. the government picks up the tab for those who are too poor. this system is known as social insurance, and it's a model that's used in many wealthy countries. as for the health care itself, that's certainly not socialist. 80% of the hospitals are private, more than in the u.s., and almost every doctor's office is a private business. dr. kono hitoshi is a typical doctor. he runs a private 19-bed hospital in the tokyo neighborhood of so
PBS
Nov 24, 2009 10:00pm EST
. in the united states, credit cards have functioned within a system where it's legal for card issuers to charge any fee or any interest rate they want without limits. >> the credit card industry has always been the wild west. the card issuers held all the cards. they could do anything they want-- $39 late fees and $35 over-limit fees; 30% interest rates. and yes, it got crazy. competition ramped up to such a level that it created an industry that was out of control. >> bergman: the industry got out of control because, over the last 30 years, regulations on banks and consumer lending that had been in place since the great depression were steadily eliminated. >> the cops left the streets. there was no one on the beat. >> bergman: christopher dodd of connecticut is the chairman of the senate banking committee. >> where were the regulators in all of this? >> bergman: he says that, for decades, both republicans and democrats voted for deregulation. >> look, i voted for it. >> bergman: you voted for the deregulation? >> yes. but we were wrong. and the message out there to the financial industry was,
WETA
Nov 18, 2009 4:00pm EST
, the united states? >> yes, yes, yes. it was the best system in th world, we thought. >> reid: yh, youhought. and when you studied it, wt did you find >> well, amerin is not really a syst that you can copy. it's a mart. so if yolet things happen it will be li the unitestates. there are many supporter but the end we said, "no, this is not the way we wanto go >> reid: they waed a system that gaveverybody equal access to health care, free choicof docts with no waiting time, and a system that couraged lots of competition amg medical priders. to financehe scheme, they chose a national insance systemhat forced everybody to join iand pay. but profesr hsiao thought taiwan could improve oother countries like japan a germany >> we trto correct their mistakes. japan has many funds. >> reid: yes. >> and wunified it. geany let the rich people opt out. we do not let the rich peopl opt out. so we're building on whathey have de correctly, but trying to overcome their ficiencies. >> reid: the solutn: to have one government insurer collecting t money and no chance to t out. the resulta system that works a bi
WETA
Nov 12, 2009 3:00am EST
's a mart. so if yolet things happen it will be li the united states. there are many supporter but the end we said, "no, this is not the way we wanto go." >> reid: ty wanted a system th gave everybody equal access to health care, freehoice of doctors with no waiting time and a systemhat encouraged lots of competitn among medil providers. to financehe scheme, they chose a national insance systemhat forced everybody to join iand pay. but profesr hsiao thought taiwan could improve oother countries like japan a germany >> we trto correct their mistakes. japan has many funds. >> reid: yes. >> and wunified it. geany let the rich people opt out. we do not let the rich peopl opt out. so we're building on whathey have de correctly, but trying to overcome their ficiencies. >> reid: the solutn: to have one government insurer collecting t money and no chance to t out. the resulta system that works a bit like the u. medicare systemor the elderly, and, in facta lot like canada's. >> ihas drug benefits, vision care, traditional chinese medicine, kiey dialysis, inpaent care, outpatient care; just abo ever
WETA
Nov 26, 2009 3:00am EST
are growing almost three tes as fast as... acredit card usag in the united states >>an i have a 12-ounce, single espresso? >> because of the uncertnty that surrounds credicards, nsumers are abanning their credit productfor debit cards. >> norma, your vanillaatte is up. >> bergman: anconsumers feel that debit cas are safer. >> with debit cards,f course, you're using your own ney. but debicards can be, under certain circumstans, even more expensive than credicards. >> bergm: because, just like your credit card, the is a trap builtnto debit cards. that trap has itorigins 20 ars ago with an idea popularized by this man, texas-basebanking consulta bill strk. strunk cvinced banks that they should allow customers to overdraw their accountand charge them a fee to dit. what you saw 20 years o... >>ight. >> bergm: ...was that people were writing ches. if they bounced, they woul oftehave to pay more than one fee to the ban >> oh,bsolutely. bergman: plus to the retailer. >> plus te fees. , i'm saving them the $30 or $40 merchantee and the late fees a let alone the emrrassment of it. you know, it's n
WETA
Nov 17, 2009 10:00pm EST
of many iranians, in fact, at eir biggest threat now was n longerhe great satan, the united states, it wano longer externalhreats. but at the biggest threat to the gime, really, was coming om inside iran. >> narrator: itsegitimacy now question, the regime brought out its yalists. it was an impressi show of rength for a president who claimed overwhelming suppo, and dismissed the otestors as "dirt and dust >> ahmadinejad is a acksmiths' son, ande is, at heart, a socialist. he wanted toe able to help the people, and so an awful loof people, u know, voted for him. it perfectly natural. ( cheers ) >>arrator: nader mokhtari is a comnist for a hard-line newspaper whblames the violen on opposition leader moussavi. >> ihe had not said the election had bn rigged, wiout any evidence, substantiaevidence, none of this would havhappened. that's rabble rousing. we're not going give up iran because . moussavi has lied we will not give up an, because weaid such a heavy pre to have it, and this is the voice of t majority of anians. >> narrator: it waturning into war of numbers. the opposion fought
WETA
Nov 24, 2009 10:00pm EST
best marketing wds in the united states arefree" and ll you can eat." people love that so they love fe checking, and it brought in a loof customers that didn't ha a checking account befo. >> bgman: so why not offer them free ecking... >> right. >> bergm: ...and pick up the money... >> other ways. >> beran: the concept paying overdfts-- loaning customers money when the accounts a empty-- quickly caughtn at banks across america becausit was so profitle. anthose profits exploded when the banks began to attach det cardto those free checking accounts, prucing billions of dollars in revenue. they don't charge a fee to ge you a bit card? >> they're free untiyou make a miake, and then you pay dearly. >> is just easy when you have a debit card to use it, t one month i dn't get the deposit from my tent, and i didn't realize it. i bought a smallizza for $7 d ended up getting charged a $33 fee. so it ended up being a40 zza. >> bergman: e bank covered the $7 dollar pizza purcse evenhough her account was emy, and then they charged her a $33 fee,he equivalent of over 24,000% annualnterest rate for a
WETA
Nov 25, 2009 4:00pm EST
checking? >> yes. bergman: the fees from that >> it would. the two best marketing wor in the united states are "ee" and "a you can eat." people love that. so they lo free checking, and it brought in a lot customers that didn't have checking account before >> beran: so why not offer them free chking... right. >>ergman...and pick up the mone.. >> other ways. >> bergm: the concept of paying overdras-- loaning customers money when their accounts arempty-- quickly caught oat banks across america because was so profitab. and ose profits exploded wn the banks began to attacdebit rds to those free checking accounts, proding billions of dollars in revenue. ey don't charge a fee to giv you a det card? >> they're free until u make a miste, and then you pay dearly. >> it'just easy when you have a debit card to use it, buone month i di't get the deposit from my tena, and i didn't realize it. i bought a small pza for $7 and ended up getting charg a $33 fee. so it ended up being a $ pia. >> bergman: thbank covered the $7 dollar pizza purcha even tugh her account was empt and then they charged her a $33
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)